Bearhawk Trifecta – New Zealand Sport Flying Magazine

For the third year in a row, Bearhawk pilot Jonathan Battson won the annual Healthy Bastards Bush Pilot Champs STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) competition. The event is held in Blenheim, New Zealand, home to the Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre — a “living” museum commemorating the two World Wars. The main objective in the STOL component of the competition is to get airborne in the shortest distance, and then touch down safely bringing the aircraft to a stop also in the shortest distance. Battson took top spot in the Heavy Touring Category (>2,550 lb) in his Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft. As has become customary for Battson in the Bearhawk, his winning score was by a wide margin. Battson completed the trifecta of wins in 2019, 2020 and 2021.

Whether flying for sport and recreation, to make the best use of one’s time, or out of basic necessity, there is no equal to the Bearhawk. A triphibious Bearhawk with its array of landing options, carrying capacity and superior strength is prepared, all around, to ensure each challenge is met with reliability and strength. The combination of wheel, ski and float options on the Bearhawk, along with three successive competition victories, exemplify trifectas of achievement—that involving three successful outcomes.

Bearhawk aircraft are available in kit or plan form. Models range from 2-, 4- and 6-Place configurations. All Bearhawk aircraft excel at accessing remote airstrips and are renown for their rugged construction and carrying capacity. Avipro/ Bearhawk Aircraft manufactures high quality Quick Build kits for the Bearhawk 4-Place Model B, Bearhawk Patrol, Bearhawk Companion, and Bearhawk LSA, and Bearhawk Model 5.

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American Legend Aircraft Company Delivers MOAC, LSA, Kits, Restorations and Wins STOL Competition with its Legend Cub

SULPHUR SPRINGS, TEXAS, JUNE 23, 2021 – American Legend Aircraft Company announced today successive deliveries of MOAC, LSA, and Legend Cub Kit aircraft, and a restored Super Cub. A recent visit to a National STOL Series event saw Legend Cubs take the top four positions in a single category.

The Texas-based manufacturer has been in operation since 2005, earning its reputation as the preeminent builder of the classic high-wing, tandem seater. The array of offerings at Legend today highlights the best practices of Cub construction. According to Darin Hart, company president, “Sales have boomed since September 2020.” Here’s a sampling of what has been produced.

MOAC / Super Legend XP

MOAC, the Mother Of All Cubs and a Legend original, is an experimental certified Legend Cub with a gross weight of 2,000 lb plus the ability to accommodate three persons. Recent MOAC builder/customers include Brian Steck of Mineola, Texas. Steck flies often for business in a pressurized Piper turbine, but for fun he chose MOAC. Its seats tell the story with “Scooter” embroidered on the front position and “Along for the Ride” at the aft place. Steck spent hours at American Legend Aircraft Company hands-on in the construction of his customized MOAC. It first flew in March 2020.

MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photo courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
MOAC by Brian Steck. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.

Greg Kirk of Livingston, Texas, was doing some training during the Steck build. In July his Super Legend XP, duly scribed on the cowl, along with MOAC on its wingtip, departed KSLR with an electronic triggered Continental IOX-370 195-hp fuel injected engine.

Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photos courtesy of Matt Short.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Chandler Teagin.
Super Legend XP by Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Chandler Teagin.
MOAC / Super Legend XP aircraft by Brian Steck and Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
MOAC / Super Legend XP aircraft by Brian Steck and Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
MOAC / Super Legend XP aircraft by Brian Steck and Greg Kirk. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
MOAC / Super Legend XP aircraft by Brian Steck and Greg Kirk. Photos courtesy of Matt Short.

Also in the recent release lineup of Super Legend customers was repeat owner Greg Rodriguez of Franklin, Louisiana. Rodriquez’ new AL18, with its carbureted Continental OX-370 engine, was coincidentally inspector Mel Asberry’s 1,000th aircraft certification occurring in December 2020. Rodriguez previously flew an AL3 on floats. His flying companion in Louisiana took delivery of a new Legend FloatCub, on PK straight floats, in April 2021.

Greg Rodriguez and his Super Legend XP.
Greg Rodriguez with his airworthiness certificate and Super Legend XP.
Mel Asberry hands Greg Rodriguez the airworthiness approval for his Super Legend XP.
Mel Asberry hands Greg Rodriguez the airworthiness approval for his Super Legend XP.
A Legend FloatCub on carbon fiber floats by PK Floats. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
A Legend FloatCub on carbon fiber floats by PK Floats of Lincoln, Maine. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.

A Sun ’n Fun 2021 delivery, Mike Lemons of Conway, Arkansas received “The Punisher,” his black/orange/silver tricked out MOAC. It’s tempered by a screaming fuel-injected Titan IOX-370 engine beneath the searing circle/star/skull emblem on its cowl.

Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP MOAC.
Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP MOAC.
Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP MOAC.
Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP MOAC.
Mike Lemons’ Super Legend XP (black/orange). Photos courtesy of Matt Short.
Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP in a three-aircraft formation.
Mike Lemons’ Super Legend XP in MOAC x3 formation.
Mike Lemons' Super Legend XP in formation with a Legend FloatCub.
Mike Lemons’ Super Legend XP in formation with a Legend FloatCub.

Bill Wirth of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, took delivery of his dream Super Legend with its go-fast checkered rudder in May 2021. Wirth first inquired about doing a demo flight at Oshkosh in 2018. His brand new Legend features slats, Shock Monster struts, tundra tires, and a Titan OX-340 engine.

Bill Wirth's Super Legend XP.
Bill Wirth's Super Legend XP.
Bill Wirth's Super Legend XP.
Bill Wirth’s Super Legend XP became reality after life’s three-year interruption.

Legend Cub S-LSA

The S-LSA Legend Cub is ASTM certified at 1,320-lb gross weight. It’s the paradigm of the popular Legend fleet and has been in production since 2005. The aforementioned Legend FloatCub is also an ASTM certified S-LSA with a 1,430-lb gross weight allowance.

With pre-owned Legend Cubs in high demand these days, the factory has three of its AL3 versions scheduled for delivery this year, one of which is headed to Australia shortly. In addition, the first-built Tweety is back, having been completely restored with a few updates.

AL11 (left) faces off with AL3 (right) down under. Australian based Legend Cubs.
AL11 (left) faces off with AL3 (right) down under. Australian based Legend Cubs.
One of many Legend Cubs operating in Australia. Photo courtesy of Wayne Gibson Photographic.
One of many Legend Cubs operating in Australia. Photo courtesy of Wayne Gibson Photographic.
The original Legend Cub "Tweety" fully restored. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.
The original Legend Cub “Tweety” fully restored. Photo courtesy of Matt Short.

Legend Cub Kit

While MOAC is a builder-assist aircraft produced at the factory to satisfy higher gross weight certification, kit versions of the AL3, AL11 and AL18 models, on the other hand, are shipped for assembly outside the factory.

Jim Clements of Cresson, Texas is building an AL11, while Sheldon Stewart of Godley, Texas is completing an AL18 kit. Tooth puller Dr. Bob Erickson of Bangor, Maine is 12-plus months into his project, “The Extractor.” It will feature dual Dynon SkyViews. Meanwhile, a student-built Legend Cub STEM project is well underway in McKinney, Texas.

Bob Erickson's "Extractor" is an AL18 Legend Cub he's building at home.
Bob Erickson’s “Extractor” is an AL18 he’s building at home.
The AL18 Legend Cub "Extractor" will feature dual Dynon SkyView displays and autopilot.
The “Extractor” will feature dual Dynon SkyView displays and autopilot.

Kit-built Legend Cubs are completed by their builders then certified under the FAA 51-percent rule for amateur-built aircraft. Construction is straightforward and well-documented. A Legend Cub kit eliminates the need for specialized tools and fixtures. Each airframe is fully welded and sealed from corrosion, and the all-aluminum wings are fully riveted at the factory. Assembly is all that’s required of the nuts, bolts, cables, pulleys, fuel lines, fittings, etc.

Restorations

Every Cub has a story. What makes this one remarkable are its two new owner/caretakers who operate other aircraft for a multitude of reasons, yet fly this one solely for the fun of it. Celebrating this Super Cub restoration only begins with its paint scheme. Extra equipment on board reveals a covetous pick list of STCs and so-called Alaska mods: Power-saving and brighter LED lighting; Shock absorbing polymer suspension by AOSS with safety cables and giant tundra tires; Dual cargo doors for stowage both behind the rear seat and in the turtle deck; An advanced panel just in case your eyes wander inside the windscreen.

Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.
Restored Piper Super Cub by American Legend Aircraft Company. Photos courtesy of Jim Wilson Photography.

SwampSTOL Sweep

Lastly, and firstly, at the national SwampSTOL competition held in Louisiana recently, Legend Cubs took first, second, third and fourth places in the Bush Experimental Class while a fifth Legend pilot also placed third in the Light Sport Class. For details visit nationalstol.com.

The Legend Refined

American Legend Aircraft Company continues to be one of the most successful manufacturers of personal aircraft, and is renown for its exceptional product support. The Legend Cub is sensibly modern, a joy to fly, and built-to-last.

For further information on the Legend Cub, contact American Legend Aircraft Company at 1810 Piper Lane, Sulphur Springs, Texas 75482; call 903-885-7000, or log on to www.legend.aero. Follow on facebook @LegendAircraft and Instagram @legendcub.

– Legend Cub –

Additional Super Legend XP / MOAC aircraft you may have seen:

Oregon based Super Legend XP built by Chad Russell. This full extreme experimental Legend is a real backcountry aircraft yet it’s equipped with an IFR suite of Garmin avionics including autopilot.
Russell chose a Legend Cub for its build quality, fit and finish, and durability. He also wanted a new IOX-340 stroker engine. A detail-oriented person, he noted, “The total harmony I feel flying a well balanced Cub, even at 85 mph, is about the best thing in life!”
Tony Kasabasich of northern California created the Shock Monster system for enhanced backcountry flying. He flies Shock Monster exclusively on his Super Legend XP.
Russell and Kasabasich are members of the Flying Cowboys and STOL Rats, champions and promoters of backcountry aviation.
The Super Legend XP takes full advantage of the extended landing gear, fat tires, and of course the Shock Monster system by TK1 Racing.
Bo Ellis completed his MOAC in Fall 2019, including a Cessna-style square tail.
Ellis is one of the High Sierra Fly-In organizers, a STOL drag racing event held annually on Dead Cow Lakebed in the Nevada desert.

Bearhawk Aircraft Announces First Flight of Side-by-Side Bearhawk Companion, and Bearhawk Gathering in New Zealand

AUSTIN, TEXAS, MAY 17, 2021 – Bearhawk Aircraft announced today the first flight of a Bearhawk Companion, side-by-side two-place aircraft. The Companion is a utility aircraft with backcountry flying characteristics. It derived from the tandem seating Bearhawk Patrol wings and the 4-Place Bearhawk Model 5 fuselage.

Design goal cruise speed of 145 mph (126 knots indicated) has been met, as well as payload target of 1,070 lb. The first flight of a Bearhawk Companion was performed by the aircraft’s builder Dave Lenart of Bethel, Vermont. Dave completed the build from a manufactured kit. An experienced builder and mechanic, Dave has built two prior Bearhawk aircraft including 4-Place and LSA models. He is currently assembling a Patrol.

Working closely with Bob Barrows, creator of the Bearhawk lineup, Dave incorporated a 180-hp Lycoming O-360 engine built by Bob into the first flying Companion. The aircraft features completely flush-riveted aluminum wings, a super strong steel tube fuselage, and an airfoil shaped empennage. The two-place Companion handles and performs much like the narrower Patrol. A slightly shorter fuselage makes it sportier than the “SUV/pickup” styled Bearhawk 4-Place.

The build was completed in 10 months and an estimated 1,000 hours—a short timeframe by most kit-built aircraft standards. The first Companion has accumulated 12 hours thus far in flight tests at held Lebanon Municipal Airport (KLEB), also confirming center of gravity loading.

According to Dave, “The shorter nose of the Companion makes taxi visibility very good. With full fuel of 55 gallons, the aircraft has proven very stable.” He noted that clean stall is at 42 knots indicated, and 38 knots with full flaps. The aircraft was engineered by Bob with STOL characteristics in mind. A Riblett airfoil gives the aircraft uncharacteristically higher cruise speeds than other aircraft of its class.

Commenting on the kit, “I see excellent quality welding, fit and finish of the tubular steel frame. Wings were delivered at an advanced stage of completion. Tanks were installed, wings were drilled with proper dihedral and angle of incidence. The wing struts were finished. Its tail surfaces were balanced.” Dave added, “The skylight formers and other improvements are nice updates to the older kits.” He estimated a savings of 100 hours or more from his earlier projects.

Buyers were clamoring for a side-by-side, two-place Bearhawk and the Companion delivered. The result is a very rugged utility plane with a large area for cargo. The model was introduced in August 2019, with first kit deliveries in January of 2020. Dave’s Companion came in at 1,130-lb empty weight and 2,200-lb gross. It spins a Catto 76×62 two-blade, composite cruise propeller.

Bearhawk Owners Gather in New Zealand

The other down under is an untamed wilderness comprising the South and North islands of New Zealand. Together they outsize Great Britain. However, just over 5,000 aircraft are registered in New Zealand, while Great Britain is the fourth-largest aerospace producer in the world and lists about 27,000 aircraft operating in country. Nevertheless, the Bearhawk has come to roost in the southern hemisphere.

The first ever Bearhawk gathering took place in New Zealand the last weekend in April 2021. In attendance were two 4-Place Bearhawk aircraft, a Patrol, and an LSA. “Participants included other wannabes [not to be confused with wallabies] and guys still building,” according to Bearhawk.

Graeme Prankerd, of Stratford, owns PBH, the only Bearhawk Patrol flying in New Zealand. Jonathan Battson of Christchurch and father/son team Murray and Dave Patterson, also of South Island, fly 4-Place Bearhawks NJB and FHR, respectively. Not in the photos was Nic Roberts of Hawkes Bay, his Bearhawk LSA is presently the lone example of this model in New Zealand. Simon Nicholson expects to have his 4-Place completed by Christmas 2021. While the seasons may be different down under, the holiday still falls in the late December timeframe.

All Bearhawk models appeal to backcountry and cross-country flyers alike, and can perform a variety of flying activities. The 4-Place Bearhawk fills a utility and transport role extremely well with its large cabin. The Bearhawk Patrol is a tandem two-place version that excels at accessing remote airstrips. The Bearhawk LSA is a lightweight design that meets U.S. Sport Pilot requirements. The Bearhawk Companion is a side-by-side 2-place model with superior strength and payload capability. Each aircraft excels at stable slow flight and attains higher than expected cruise speeds. Bearhawk Aircraft manufactures high quality quick-build kits for all models.

For more information on Bearhawk Aircraft, visit www.bearhawkaircraft.com, or contact Bearhawk at info@bearhawkaircraft.com or 1-877-528-4776.

– Bearhawk –

First completed Bearhawk Companion
First completed Bearhawk Companion. Built by Dave Lenart of Bethel, Vermont.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Two Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft and one Bearhawk Patrol. Bearhawk LSA not shown.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Two Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft and one Bearhawk Patrol. Bearhawk LSA not shown. Photos courtesy of Murray Paterson.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Graeme Prankerd, Jonathan Battson, father/son Murray and Dave Patterson, Simon Nicholson and son Aidan.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Graeme Prankerd, Jonathan Battson, father/son Murray and Dave Patterson, Simon Nicholson and son Aidan.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Bearhawk Patrol and two Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft. Bearhawk LSA not shown.
New Zealand Bearhawk Gathering, L-R: Bearhawk Patrol, 4-Place Bearhawk, and Bearhawk LSA.

Also featured on Kitplanes.com:

Bearhawk Aircraft Trifectas: Seasonal Operations on Wheels, Floats and Skis, and 3X STOL Competition Winner

AUSTIN, TEXAS, APRIL 9, 2021 – Bearhawk Aircraft announced today the successful operations of a Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft on wheels, floats and skis. The Bearhawk is a rugged design built originally for heavy hauling and bulky loads. As a “triphibious” airplane, the Bearhawk 4-Place performs equally well on wheels, floats and skis apropos of the season.

Owner/operator/builder of the kit-built Bearhawk, Robert Taylor is based in Kenai, Alaska, a coastal city southwest of Anchorage on the mouth of the Kenai River. Having access to shorelines, waterways and often-frozen tundra, Taylor accentuates his flying preferences with the turf, water and snow options of his triphibious Bearhawk aircraft. “My son and I built the aircraft together. The idea from the start was to put it on floats. I fly year-round here in Alaska. I am on skis now, but it’s time to swap to wheels. In June, the airplane will go to a nearby lake and be on floats again,” Taylor commented.

Taylor’s triphibious Bearhawk is powered by a carbureted Lycoming O-540-E4B5, 6-cylinder engine. (For comparison, this is the same big-bore block typically found on Piper PA-32 Cherokee Six and Britten Norman BN-2 Islander aircraft.) Taylor is an A&P mechanic and former inspector. Since completing his Bearhawk in August of 2017, he’s accumulated over 400 hours flight time in it.

On wheels, the aircraft is powerful and responsive, according to Taylor, with the 260-hp Lycoming O-540 up front. He indicated, “The flight controls are very responsive and can be flown with two fingers. Stalls are very predictable with no tendency to drop one wing. The 6-cylinder Lycoming has all the power you could ever need, which makes it a safe airplane to fly.” Taylor affirms having seen speeds of up to 160 mph IAS in the aircraft and claims landing speeds of 52 mph, both while on wheels. “The ability to fly fast and also fly slow makes the aircraft very versatile. At a power setting of 22 x 22 [2,200 rpm x 22 inches MP], the Bearhawk economically cruises at around 130 mph burning 11–12 gph.”

Building the Bearhawk as floatplane for operation on the Kenai Peninsula equates to placing it in its natural habitat. Landing locations are abundant. “It has proven to be a very nice, straight forward floatplane,” Taylor stated. The installation of Edo 2870 floats (now serviced and supported by Kenmore Air of Kenmore, Washington) required minimal modification. The model 2870 was originally certified for use on Cessna 180/185 Skywagons. Adding floats slows down the aircraft by 15 mph in cruise, due to increased drag, according to Taylor. A ventral fin (a single strake / tail fin beneath the empennage) was also installed. This enhances directional stability when flying at higher angles of attack. Taylor claims takeoff time from idle to separation is approximately six seconds at sea level. An allowed gross weight of 2,700 lb on floats makes the aircraft “truly useful,” he contends. Water operations thrive on agility, and that’s where a Bearhawk floatplane excels. Taylor added, “The double cargo doors really shine when loading or unloading cargo on floats. Forward visibility is exceptional on the float-equipped Bearhawk.”

On skis, Taylor notes, the cruise speed of the Bearhawk 4-Place is slightly faster than on wheels due to reduced drag. “The extra power comes in very useful on skis in deep powder snow, and especially on floats.” As winter conditions dictate, Taylor’s Bearhawk gets fitted with M3000 main skis (all metal wheel replacements from Aero Ski of Brooten, Minnesota) and a T3000 tail ski (an all-aluminum wheel-penetration ski for the Scott 3200 tailwheel). When flying frozen tundra, “This combination gives a very useful ski plane. Handling characteristics are similar to flying on wheels,” he added.

“As a pilot, I find the Bearhawk meets all my needs. As a licensed aircraft mechanic, I have had experience with just about all the classic general aviation light aircraft. With this in mind, I find the quality of materials and workmanship of the 4-Place Bearhawk compare favorably with any certified category aircraft I have worked on,” Taylor asserted.

New Zealand STOL Winner Trifecta for Bearhawk

For the third year in a row, Bearhawk pilot Jonathan Battson wins the annual Healthy Bastards Bush Pilot Champs STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) competition. The event is held in Blenheim, New Zealand, home to the Omaka Aviation Heritage Center—a “living” museum commemorating the two World Wars (www.omaka.org.nz). The main objective in the STOL component of the competition is to get airborne in the shortest distance, and then touch down safely bringing the aircraft to a stop also in the shortest distance. Battson took top spot in the Heavy Touring Category (>2,550 lb) in his Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft. As has become customary for Battson in the Bearhawk, his winning score was by a wide margin. Battson completed the trifecta of wins in 2019, 2020 and 2021.

FMI go to www.marlboroughaeroclub.co.nz/healthy-bastards/Healthy-Bastards-introduction/

Whether flying for sport and recreation, to make the best use of one’s time, or out of basic necessity, there is no equal to the Bearhawk. A triphibious Bearhawk with its array of landing options, carrying capacity and superior strength is prepared, all around, to ensure each challenge is met with reliability and strength. The combination of wheel, ski and float options on the Bearhawk, along with three successive competition victories, exemplify trifectas of achievement—that involving three successful outcomes.

Bearhawk aircraft are available in kit or plan form. Models range from 2-, 4- and 6-Place configurations. All Bearhawk aircraft excel at accessing remote airstrips and are renown for their rugged construction and carrying capacity. Avipro / Bearhawk Aircraft manufactures high quality Quick Build kits for the Bearhawk 4-Place Model B, Bearhawk Patrol, Bearhawk Companion, and Bearhawk LSA, and Bearhawk Model 5.

For more information on Bearhawk Aircraft, visit www.bearhawkaircraft.com, or contact Bearhawk at info@bearhawkaircraft.com or 1-877-528-4776.

– Bearhawk –

Robert Taylor’s triphibious Bearhawk 4-Place aircraft.
STOL competition photos (Bearhawk NJB) courtesy of Phil Craig.
STOL competition photos (Bearhawk NJB) courtesy of Phil Craig.
STOL competition photos (Bearhawk NJB) courtesy of Phil Craig.
STOL competition photos (Bearhawk NJB) courtesy of Phil Craig.

Bearhawk Aircraft Announces Model B First Flights and Model 5 Kit Deliveries

AUSTIN, TEXAS, MARCH 1, 2021 – Bearhawk Aircraft announced today two first flights of Bearhawk Model B aircraft in Idaho and California. The Bearhawk Model B is a 4-Place aircraft designed by engineer Bob Barrows. Also, aircraft kits of the Bearhawk Model 5, a 6-Place design announced last May, have shipped. The first four customers of the Model 5 have received their kits and construction is underway. All Bearhawk aircraft models employ superior strength and durability in their construction. Designed to fly fast and land slow, Bearhawk aircraft are renown for their short field capabilities, gentle slow speed manners, and hauling capacity.

The Idaho-based Bearhawk Model B was completed in under one year by Brent Huddleston, a short timeframe considering he’s a first-time aircraft builder. Brent says his new Bearhawk has more performance than his previous O-470-powered Cessna 182Q. He had never flown a taildragger, but this did not deter him from comparing the Bearhawk to others in his search for a kit. In the end, according to Brent, “The Bearhawk was the fastest, had the best specs, big doors, and, by comparison, the 182 was too small for even my dog.”

Brent installed an IO-540 engine, “ported and polished to 9.5:1 compression,” on his Bearhawk. With the big 300-hp engine, Brent and his instructor say it’s very responsive, not light, and yet not heavy on the controls. Brent has his own landing strip and already appreciates the difference in climb attitude, noting that the 182 points up in climb, while the Bearhawk is still gaining speed at 1200 fpm and 3/4-throttle but “feels level.” He claims speeds of 155 mph TAS, and says he’s getting many compliments on workmanship, paint and finish.

A second Model B builder, Tim Newsome of California, flew his Bearhawk for the first time last month. The Bearhawk Model B is a “refinement” of the original 4-Place Bearhawk by Bob Barrows. Enhancements to the Model B include a longer, speedier and more stable Riblett 30-413.5 airfoil, and weight-saving aluminum fuselage formers, window sills, and door sills in place of steel. Airfoil shaped empennage surfaces improve stability, control authority, and speed. The 4-Place Bearhawk is long-established as best-in-class for its speed, STOL capability, and large payload carrying capacity.

Four Bearhawk Model 5 kits have arrived in the hands of their respective builders. Virgil Irwin took delivery of one in Oklahoma, albeit, the aircraft is ultimately destined for West Africa. “The kit has been fantastic so far,” said Virgil. He plans to have it flying by October, and meanwhile will be finishing up his A&P certificate. The Bearhawk is Virgil’s first complete build, adding, “I will have a couple of guys helping off and on.” The instrument panel will be IFR-capable and built around the Garmin G3X. Once in Africa, the aircraft will be based on a dirt runway. Virgil states there is no actual IFR in the country, however, “Niger weather in the Sahara desert requires special VFR due to dirt in the air.”

The West African destination is tied to the missionary work the aircraft will service. Hence, Virgil expects to obtain permission to operate off-airport. He noted that Niger has no general aviation and only six such aircraft are based in the country now. Thus, no avgas is available. While it can be special ordered, at an exorbitant $22/gal., the Bearhawk will need to run on auto gas. Per its mission, the aircraft will be operating heavy all the time and Virgil needed, “a big aircraft that hauls a lot.” The Bearhawk Model 5 fit the criteria. It will employ a Lycoming IO-540 engine with 8.7:1 compression and EFII (Electronic Fuel Injection and Ignition).

A second Model 5 kit was recently delivered to a customer in the Houston area. Ryan Barker of Livingston, Texas, is a commercial pilot. After flying the Bearhawk 4-Place and 6-Place models, Ryan determined the Model 5 is the best all around plane for him and his family on their grass strip. Ryan is another first-time builder and expects to work solo on the build, enlisting help when needed. He looked at other aircraft, including certified models, for his family of five. “I wanted a family truckster,” he stated. “The demo flight really validated my choice. The engine will be an angle-valve IO-540.”

Two additional Bearhawk Model 5 builders have begun construction in Lincoln, Nebraska, and Jackson, New Hampshire. The aircraft’s design was in response to a customer’s call for more cabin and more payload. It’s the only 6-seat purpose-built kit aircraft on the market, and the first in the lineup of Bearhawk aircraft to use a 300-horsepower engine. The Model 5’s fuselage is slightly wider by two inches, and longer by 14, than the original 4-Place Bearhawk. The Model 5 has considerably more interior room than Cessna’s load-carrying 185 Skywagon. Gross weight is 3,000 lb, with utility category strength at full gross. Cruise speeds of 160 mph combine with exceptional takeoff and landing performance on the Model 5.

Bearhawk aircraft are available in kit or plan form. Models range from 2-, 4- and 6-Place configurations. All Bearhawk aircraft excel at accessing remote airstrips and are renown for their rugged construction and large cargo areas. Avipro / Bearhawk Aircraft manufactures high quality Quick Build kits for the Bearhawk 4-Place Model B, Bearhawk Patrol, Bearhawk Companion, and Bearhawk LSA, and new Bearhawk Model 5.

For more information on Bearhawk Aircraft, visit www.bearhawkaircraft.com, or contact Bearhawk at info@bearhawkaircraft.com or 1-877-528-4776.

– Bearhawk –

Idaho-based Bearhawk Model B with IO-540 Lycoming engine.
Bearhawk Model B instrument panel.
Bearhawk Model B cockpit.
Bearhawk Model B during construction.
Ryan Barker takes delivery of his Bearhawk Model 5 kit.
Bearhawk Model 5, unpacking the kit.
Bearhawk Model 5, fitting the empennage prior to covering.
Ryan Barker‘s Bearhawk Model 5, great expectations on leaving the hangar.

Piper Cub PEDAL PLANE Plans

Build a Pedal Plane, a pint-sized version of a Piper Cub that children will love to pedal around in. These plan sets include dimensioned drawings for all wood and metal parts making it easy to build, and customize. Step-by-step instructions, a detailed parts list, and a flight manual are all included.

The replica Piper Cub resembles, and can be painted like, many versions of world famous Piper models, including: J3 Cub, PA-11 Special, PA-12 Super Cruiser, Piper PA-14 Family Cruiser, PA-15/17 Vagabond, PA-16 Clipper, PA-18 Super Cub, PA-20 Pacer, O-59 and L-4, Grasshopper, L-21 Army and Air Force Liaison, NE-1 Navy Trainer, and RAF Flitfire.

Materials and parts used in the construction are commonly available at local lumber, hardware and home stores. All that is required are basic shop tools such as hand/power drill, screwdriver, sander, saw, and wrenches.

Overall dimensions: 59 inches long, 53 inch wingspan, 28 inches high. The seat is 10.5 inches wide, perfect for 2 to 8 year old pilots. The pedal plane is driven like a tricycle and steered by the control stick. Get the plans here.

Pedal Plane Piper Cub
Pedal Plane Piper Cub
Pedal Plane Piper Cub
Pedal Plane Piper Cub
Pedal Plane Piper Cub
Pedal Plane Piper Cub